The Software Craftsman, Chapter 5 & 6

For this week, I read Chapter 5: Heroes, Goodwill, and Professionalism and Chapter 6: Working Software, from the book title The Software Craftsman by Sandro Mancuso. Chapter 5 explains the need and urgency of when and how to say “No”? Chapter 6 explains the effects of technical debts on companies and stabilization of existing code, and improving it.

In chapter 5, author explains one of the hardest thing to say in general which is saying “No”. As a professional, one must have the courage to say “No” when he/she does not think that his/her client or boss is not being reasonable or does not understand the scope of what he/she is demanding. As a professional it is our duty to stand up for ourselves and make people around us aware of the entire situation as transparently as we can. Always, be clear and careful at your decision and commitments. Be sure what you have been asked and what you are committing is achievable. I believe saying “No” is one of the hardest thing about being a professional and I hope that I don’t have to be the first one to say “No” as I am stepping into the real world. I wish that I see my senior say it first then I will follow.

Chapter 6 was my favorite chapter because it talks about a topic most software developers and companies ignore to pay attention to once they complete a job or project. I believe for any successful software company or business needs to constantly work on its old code and try to make it better in order to increase its adaptability. Companies need to hire craftsmen to refactor its existing code. I like how the author puts in the book, “rather than construction, programming is more like gardening.” this quote explains that rather than keep producing new code every time, it is more efficient to make existing code better so it is more adaptable. It can save companies time, money, and maintenance in the long run.

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